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Expatriate kids 'can feel rootless'

The pros and cons of growing up as part of an international family have been discussed by one expatriate journalist.

Writing in the Times today (September 2nd), Charles Bremner described his own experience of living in Europe, the US and Russia, as well as that of his family.

Mr Bremner said he chose an international school in Paris for his children, which left them "with a fine grasp of theory and facts but a little short on the creative side or sports skills".

Growing up in France among people of different nationalities has given his children excellent language skills but a different experience to that of their less-formal English peers, he said.

Living in the capitals of the developing world or "that great offshore centre, Brussels" is even stranger, he added.

"The heart of Euroland is like an aircraft carrier with a multinational crew that happens to be moored in a lake called Belgium."

Last week saw the Office of National Statistics release new figures suggesting increasing numbers of Britons are choosing an expatriate lifestyle.

The statistics show 395,000 people made the move abroad last year.

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