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Expatriate healthcare is 'essential' for malaria

An expatriate who lives in a country associated with malaria is advised to seek medical advice and protection against the disease.

Malaria is a serious disease, particularly for pregnant women, and can result in severe illness or even death. Both the mother and unborn baby can be affected by a single mosquito bite.

Jacqui Jedrzejewski from NHS Direct warned: "Whilst it is most common in tropical countries it is also possible to catch Malaria in other parts of the world and so you should always seek advice before you travel."

The British Medical Journal recently revealed that reported cases of imported malaria in the UK had steadily increased over the past 20 years.

Cases of Plasmodium falciparum – the deadliest malaria parasite – increased from 5,120 between 1987 and 1991 to 6,753 between 2000 and 2006.

Professional healthcare is important because the type of medication prescribed will depend on the destination country, as malaria germs can vary between different parts of the world.

Moving abroad? Get a free quote for your international medical insurance online.
ADNFCR-1788-ID-18999156-ADNFCR

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